Black history is our history, educate yourself!

 

BHS grew from a minor “Negro History Week”, that historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History innovated. These historians wanted to bring out of the shadows and darkness the pride they had in their peers for breaking through barriers to revolutionize our country. There shouldn’t be a question about why isn’t there a “White History” month.

White history is taught every day. Black History Month is important. It’s not only people of non-color, who are uneducated about black activists and intellectuals. Black people haven’t always been taught about the people and events in the civil rights movements. In any required history curriculum, black students can learn about prominent Americans of non-color. In most entry-level history classes, African American life is almost non-existent. The only evidence of blacks in these history books is that they were enslaved and set free by Abraham Lincoln. Curriculums dedicated to the studies of African American life are only electives. Students enrolled in American history should be able to learn in-depth about their beautiful and thriving heritage just, as deep as any other non-color student would be able to.

During secondary education, how many black names were taught in social studies class? Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks are not the only black figures that helped breed a nation of inclusiveness. In many cases, black people associate being intellectual as being a white characteristic, because they don’t know of black intellectuals like Rayford Logan and his studies of post-Reconstruction America.

Again, Black History Month is important! It has always been shoved into the meager month of February. During a non-leap year, 28 days is all African-Americans get to flaunt our beautiful heritage. Every day black life, intellectuality and innovations should be celebrated. Black life is important. Remembering our struggles and how we’ve overcome is important. This should not be hid behind the controversial opinions of non-color individuals that this month is not important.

Netflix has created a resource for us to start our journey of analyzing our history. The online streaming service has provided us with documentaries, mini-series and movies that will allow audiences to go in-depth into black history. Everybody loves to “Netflix and chill”, why not use that time of relaxation to learn something and start a conversation amongst peers.

These are 9 historical pieces that will give you more activists and analytical perceptions:

  1. “What Happened, Miss Simone?”

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A documentary about the life of the classically trained pianist and dive-bar songstress, “What Happened, Miss Simone?” gives the world a broad lens into Nina Simone’s musical genius. Simone, an activist and black power icon, became the voice of the civil rights movement. Simone wrote “Mississippi Goddam” in response to the assassination of Medgar Evers.

 

  1. The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross

https_proxyWritten and presented by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., “The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross” explores the evolution of black from slavery to the first black president. In six-hour series, Gates shows how African Americans forged their own history, culture and society against mind-boggling odds.

  1. The Black Power Mixtape
    MV5BMjEzMjI0ODgzOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMDQyMDkyNg@@._V1_SX640_SY720_Released in 2011, The Black Power Mixtape focused on anti-war and black power movements. Filmmaker Goran Hugo Olsson discovered the archived footage and decided that it was his responsibility to give a glimpse into the people that developed an era of convulsive change. Mixtape takes viewers on a musical journey into black communities.
  1. Mississippi Damned

Mississippi_Damned_PosterStarring Dear White People’s Tessa Thompson, this is a tale of three black youth in rural Mississippi, whom are damned by their families’ abuse addiction and violence.

 

  1. Hate Crimes in the Heartland

24314366Filmmaker Rachel Lyon explores the countless hate crimes committed in America. Hate Crimes in the Heartland tell powerful stories of survivors, leaders, activists and community members, who witnessed these crimes.

 

  1. The Trials of Muhammad Ali

imagesThis documentary follows the legal battles of Muhammad Ali against being conscripted into the United States military during the Vietnam War.

  1. Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train Comin’

hear-my-train-hendrixThe film unveils unseen performance footage of the famous guitarist and uses his own words to tell his story.

  1. Through a Lens Darkly: African American Photography

cover.jpgThis film brings to the light hidden and unknown photos of black life and families taken by black photographers. Opening a window into the African American perspective.

 

 

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Black Women’s Art: ‘Freedom’

Since, we have come to the end of Black History Month and entering Women’s History Month, these versions of ‘Freedom’ are all about black female empowerment.

From the motion picture “Panther”, ‘Freedom’ a song that may have inspired Beyoncé’s ‘Formation’ takes on the issues of black liberation and womanism through two different versions.

Lyrics like “Ladies, you got to demand what you want, and what we want is respect, right” are demanding that black women, who have always been left behind in civil rights, be heard and get the same respect as our counterparts.

Versions, rap and songstress, featuring various artists including: Queen Latifah, Yo-Yo, TLC, MC Lyte, Salt-N-Pepa, Aaliyah, and Mary J. Blidge.

 

 

#BringBackOurCurls Collaborated With Dove’s Love Your Curls

Today marks me wearing my natural hair for a full month!! *queue the confetti* When I first “big chopped” in November, I was very discouraged about how my hair would react to not receiving relaxers. I was terrified of not wearing weave, because I wasn’t sure I trusted my features enough to be just totally bare and exposed.

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Today’s society has black women kind of brainwashed to think we’re only pretty with extras added. This is a lie. I found myself digging deeper into myself as woman by letting my hair do exactly what it was made to do. It flourished. It’s healthy. This is my authentic self.

So, to encourage other women to be their authentic selves I started a social media campaign that would start a conversation. #BringBackOurCurls will be able to transcend across all social media platforms. We’re planning to receive at least 100,000 submissions from followers we’ve earned from the planning stages on our social media accounts.

My team and I collaborated with Dove’s Love Your Curls campaign. With the help of Dove, the campaign will be able to generate and reach a bigger audience.

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Dove embodies the same passion and mission statement that my team and I does. We want women to embrace their natural curl patterns and put away their straighteners. Encouraging women also helps to reach younger girls, who struggle with the same lack of confidence in their hair.

Make sure to follow this journey with the hashtags #BringBackOurCurls and #LoveYourCurls. Submit pictures and videos of you and your curls by hashtaging your posts.

Disclaimer: this was a class assignment; I’m not affiliated with the Dove #LoveYourCurls campaign or Dove.

My Natural Hair Journey

Today marks me wearing my natural hair for a full month!! *queue the confetti* When I first “big chopped” in November, I was very discouraged about how my hair would react to not receiving relaxers. I was terrified of not wearing weave, because I wasn’t sure I trusted my features enough to be just totally bare and exposed.

Today’s society has black women kind of brainwashed to think we’re only pretty with extras added. This is a lie. I found myself digging deeper into myself as woman by letting my hair do exactly what it was made to do. It flourished. It’s healthy. This is my authentic self. IMG_2121

 

 

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These are the products I use to help my curls stay on fleek:

Magazine Covers We All Should Love This September

It’s rare that we get to see more than two covers with gorgeous black faces. This month we’ve been blessed with five.

Beyonce covers Vogue’s September issue. This is the biggest issue Vogue produces every year. It’s their yearly fashion issue. This issue is always amazing for the magazine. Add Beyonce and it’s a game changer.

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Photo Courtesy of Vogue Magazine
Misty Copeland is the first African-American principal dancer for the American Ballet Theatre. Copeland rose from poverty to being on ‘pointe’ on Broadway. She made her broadway debut in “On The Town” on August 25th. She covers this September’s Essence. Even though we always see black faces on the cover of Essence, this cover will forever represent history.

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Photo Courtesy of Essence Magazine
After a public break-up with boyfriend Future and giving birth to her first child, Ciara shows us she’s stronger than ever on the cover of Shape magazine. With her hands wrapped, she’s a knockout!

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Photo Courtesy of Shape Magazine
We’ve all seen the Scandal star on the cover of Glamour this year. It wasn’t the most ideal look for Ms. Washington, but the Kerry I love is back. With her melanin on fleek, she shows her true ‘Self’ this September.

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Photo Courtesy of SELF magazine
I love seeing my favorite black celebrities on the newsstands. I love magazines so much, and I always want to be able to see myself on one of the covers. This September it happened the right way.

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